Data Collection Methods

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Data Analysis

INTERVIEWING:
The decision to use interviews in research takes place at the research design phase. Methods are selected because they are the best way of finding out what you want to know, and interviews are generally seen as an effective way of seeking people’s views. You are able to capture the emotion and dig further into pros and cons of a particular application that wouldn’t otherwise be list in a numbered survey. The decision as to how many interviews you plan to do should be decided at the design stage of your research and planned for. In reality, time and resources are often key factors which determine the number of interviews you carry out. Unfortunately this is a major con in budgeting your time. I would interview only top executives in order to get the overall perspective on the project at hand.

FOCUS GROUPS:
A focus group is a group interview of approximately six to twelve people who share similar characteristics or common interests. A facilitator guides the group based on a predetermined set of topics. The facilitator creates an environment that encourages participants to share their perceptions and points of view. Focus groups are a qualitative data collection method, meaning that the data is descriptive and cannot be measured numerically. This is very similar to an interview but on a much larger scale. The majority of the time in getting these groups together is in planning and organizing your audience so that the people have common interests. This would be great for allotting time toward the end users of the application, and focusing on their desires when it comes to being efficient.

FACILITATED WORKSHOPS:
facilitated workshops are structured workshops or meetings led by trained facilitators to bring numerous stakeholders together to define, prioritize, and agree on requirements. This allows for the facilitator to get to the questions that need answering. You would then use what you have collected to present interview questions or focus groups assignments. I personally feel that this will help you draw up a stakeholder analysis because it allows you to personally understand who it is your working for and what it is your working toward.